Winter Quarter 2012 Course Offering for MALS and IDS Students

MLS 490 – Topics in Professional Writing: Health Care Wrtiting

LPC, MW 1:00-2:30 pm; 143 McGaw Hall

(Cross-listed with WRD 320)

Eileen Seifert

 

A survey of contemporary health care writing in a variety of venues and modes by professionals, patients, and other stakeholders, with particular attention to concepts of genre and audience. Students will analyze health writing from medical journals to patient listservs and create a portfolio of writing related to and about medical issues.

Eileen Seifert is the Associate Director of FYW in the Department of Writing, Rhetoric, & Discourse. She has written on health care issues in the human resources and benefits sector and has taught a Junior Honors Seminar in health writing. Her special interest is the emerging online discourse of ovarian cancer patients and their families.

Apply Now For Up to $1,000 in Graduate Research Funding

We would like to inform you about an important program from LAS. The Graduate Research Funding (GRF) Program provides financial assistance to graduate students who plan to conduct and/or present research. All graduate students (full- and part-time) in good standing are eligible, with priority given to those with advance standing, and selections based on merit. The funding helps with tasks related to research, study, and creative work, including short-term travel to conduct research and travel to present at academic conferences. The available funding includes: up to $1,000 for international travel to present at a conference; up to $500 to present at a conference in the US and Canada; and up to $300 to support research. Students must apply by the quarterly deadlines, and decisions are made within two weeks of application. If you plan on presenting at a conference, don’t pass up this great opportunity for assistance.
 
Complete information can be found at http://las.depaul.edu/Webmedia/Research/pdfs/GRFApplication.pdf

Call for Papers: Creating Knowledge, Vol. 5

The editorial board of Creating Knowledge, the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences’ undergraduate research journal, is seeking submissions for its fifth volume, to be published near the end of the 2011-2012 academic year. Undergraduate students from all disciplines and programs who have completed a scholarly or creative project with a faculty member during the 2011 calendar year are invited to submit their work for consideration. Students who received a 2011 LAS Summer Research Grant are required to submit a write-up of their work.

The deadline for submissions is January 31, 2010. For detailed information on how to submit work to the journal and inspect volumes from previous years, please visit the college’s website: http://las.depaul.edu/Research/Undergraduate/Publications.asp.

Span from graduation to job could spell success

By Caylie Sadin Tribune Media Services

November 19, 2011

Many graduates aren’t getting a job right out of college. But how long should former students expect to wait before they’re hired? And what are the supposed to do until then?

Bora Un, assistant director of undergraduate preparation at the University of Chicago, says that it usually takes six to nine months to find a job.

“One of the mistakes we see is that some of them just spend their time on the internet,” says Donna Del Giudice, career specialist at DePaul University in Chicago. “They need to get out there and do networking. The most important thing is keeping themselves in front of people.”

One way that a graduate can do this is to volunteer. Volunteering keeps you in front of people and can give a person transferable skills that they can bring to a job in the field that they want to go in to, Del Giudice says.

Both Un and Del Giudice agree that taking an internship after college is a viable option. It again puts graduates in front of people that they might want to know and allows them to network.

“Don’t feel ashamed that you have to volunteer or take an unpaid internship,” Un says. “Get your foot in the door.”

And once you’re there, be sure to work hard. “We encourage people to try to make a good impression on the people they are working with,” Un says. “You never know who those people are. Sometimes it is knowing the right person at the right time.”

Friends with benefits

Networking on the Internet is important too, especially on LinkedIn, which lets you connect with friends, family and co-workers. It’s also a bridge to the people that they know, Un says.

“A lot of our recruiters are telling us that they are sourcing through LinkedIn,” Del Giudice says. “Students need to be on LinkedIn.”

Twitter being used as guerrilla marketing by companies is on the rise, Un says. A graduate should follow the companies that he or she would like to work for, because companies often use Twitter to post job opportunities. Sometimes those jobs will be filled within days or a week, Un says.

Even piecing together two part-time jobs that are not necessarily in the graduate’s field looks much better on a resume than nothing or a gap, Del Giudice says. An employer likes to see that the applicant has been consistently working, and working gives the graduate a little more confidence in an interview, Del Giudice says.

“Sometimes they have to look at another state,” Del Giudice says. “They may have to think outside the box by industry and by parts of the country.”

Donna Del Giudice of DePaul’s Career Center talks to the Chicago Tribune about the importance of online and offline networking.

Midwestern Grad Liberal Studies Conference, March 31

MALS/IDS Students,

We would like to let you know about an upcoming opportunity for our students to participate in a very worthwhile conference.  The Midwestern Grad Liberal Studies Conference is designed for MALS and IDS students to present their work in an academic conference setting. All types of work are welcome; we know of quite a few of our students’ culminating projects and dissertations that are nearing completion; this is the perfect opportunity to gain experience in presenting your excellent work to an audience of students and faculty involved in academic journeys very similar to yours. This is a terrific chance to expand your presentation skills, share your excellent work and build your networks. DePaul’s LAS Graduate Programs also have a small resource of funding to help cover partial expenses involved in attending conferences, and we are working on accessing that support. We will also work on sharing transportation to Fort Wayne for the conference.

Midwestern Grad Liberal Studies Conference, March 31

Saturday, March 31, 2012

10:00am – 4:00pm

Hosted by Indiana University Purdue University Ft. Wayne

The Graduate Liberal Studies programs of Indiana University invite you to participate in the second annual Midwestern Graduate Liberal Studies Conference.

The theme of this year’s conference is Taking it to the Streets: Scholarship and the Public Audience. One important goal shared by graduate liberal studies programs is that of helping students to comprehend knowledge from various academic fields and translate it for dissemination to a wider public audience. This conference focuses on ways in which our own scholarship, no matter how specialized or technical, can be reframed in order to speak directly to public concerns. We invite papers and presentations that not only lay out specific arguments and findings, but also explain how those conclusions can be addressed to a general audience, applied to problems of public concern, and/or shared meaningfully with scholars in various disciplines. We also invite papers that reflect on the challenges of presenting research and specialized knowledge to the general public.

The conference is designed to allow both formal and informal interactions among students and faculty from graduate liberal studies programs in the Midwest.

Students from graduate liberal studies programs in the Midwest region are invited to present their work at the MGLSC. All types of work will be considered: empirical research, literature reviews, case studies, works of fiction, multimedia works, etc. Work that reflects the theme of the conference, Taking it to the Streets, is especially welcome.

Authors of noteworthy presentations will be invited to submit their work to Confluence, the journal of the Association for Graduate Liberal Studies Programs.